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How to Safely Pick a Loved One (or Yourself) Up After a Fall

help fallenWhen you or a loved one has fallen, the most difficult part is getting back up again. Depending on the situation, the most important aspect to consider when picking up from a fall is any possible injury. If there is any doubt about the safety of your loved one, call 9-1-1 for help. Caregiver training courses can also provide useful information with picking someone up after their fall. Here are some strategies to use when you are sure that there is no injury involved.

Tips for picking up someone that has fallen

  1. Stay calm and help your loved one to remain calm by encouraging them to take slow, deep breaths.
  2. Examine them for injuries—bruises, possible sprain, broken bones.
  3. If they have a serious injury (e.g. a broken bone), then don't move them. Call 9-1-1, and keep your loved one as warm and comfortable as possible until help arrives.
  4. If they aren't badly hurt and they want to get up, proceed slowly and stop at any point if they become stuck or too tired to get all the way up.
  5. Find two sturdy chairs. Place one next to your loved one's head and the other down by their feet.(Keep in mind, your loved one needs to be the one doing the physical work of getting up. You're just there to help guide them and keep them steady, not lift their weight.)
  6. Help your loved one roll over onto their side, assist them into a kneeling position. If they suffer from sore knees, a towel placed underneath the knees can make them more comfortable.
  7. Move the chair closest to their head directly in front of where they are kneeling so that they can place their hands on the seat, evenly.
  8. Ask your loved one to lean on the seat as they bring one leg forward and place that foot on the floor.
  9. Move the second chair directly behind your loved one, then ask them to use their arms and legs to push themselves up, then sit back into the second chair. You can use your hands to keep your loved one steady, but keep your back upright and make sure they are doing the physical work to lift themselves.
  10. Notify their doctor that they've had a fall.

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Preparing for Blood Tests - More Than Just Fasting

reporting all medications to your doctor before blood testsA new survey reveals Americans are not aware of what to report prior to a blood test. Only half (52 percent) believe it is very important to report use of supplements to their healthcare provider before getting a blood test.

With recent interest in the use of supplements like biotin as beauty treatments, it’s especially critical for consumers, doctors and lab personnel to talk before blood tests because very high doses of supplements could interfere with some test results.

The possibility of interference in blood testing is low, but if you’re taking high-dose biotin for hair, skin or nail health, for example, it is best to inform your doctor before a blood test. Just as you may need to fast before certain types of tests, you may need to hold off on taking supplements like biotin for at least eight hours before blood work.

The survey, commissioned by Roche Diagnostics, also found that most Americans (85 percent) expect their physician to provide complete instructions on how to prepare for a blood test.

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Sundowning May Cause Increased Symptoms at the End of the Day

sundownDoes your loved one experience anxiety, change in mood, or depression around sundown? He or she could be experiencing sundowner's syndrome, or sundowning, which is marked by mood changes or increased anxiety, depression, fear or anger around twilight each day.   

People with Sundowner's Syndrome may also "shadow" their caregivers, following them around and doing everything they do. They might ask questions over and over or interrupt conversations with someone else. They may lose their full language abilities, and abstract thoughts may become especially difficult for them to comprehend.

 

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Senior guest? How to Prepare Your Home for Older Visitors

Whether it's for a special occasion or just because, hosting an older adult in your home canelderly-guest be a wonderful experience with lots of memory-making potential. However, for a safe and successful visit, you may want to make a few adjustments to your home before they arrive to make it more senior-friendly.

"Spending time with aging parents or grandparents is a wonderful experience for all generations," says Sara Terry, Brookdale Senior Living's senior vice president of resident and family engagement. "Creating a welcoming and relaxing atmosphere is the job of any good host and that is no different when entertaining seniors. Considering older adults' varying mobility and comfort levels, there are a few adjustments you can make to your home to meet their needs."

Whether your guest is staying short- or long-term, Terry offers these six tips to help you transform your home into a more senior-friendly environment so you can focus on what matters most: making memories with your entire family.

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A Cup of Tea Can Be the Best Solution for Everyday Wellness

teaBefore medicine and pharmaceuticals filled our remedy box, food and food ingredients were considered healing agents. Hippocrates was wise in his understanding of the special powers of food, beyond satisfying our appetites: “Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food.”

There are many cultures that rely on herbal remedies and natural foods for everything from soothing an upset stomach to lifting our spirits when we’re down, to calming jittery nerves and even fending off colds and flu. Many of the best cosmetics tout ingredients to smooth skin, prevent aging, block the sun, reduce inflammation and minimize puffiness. There are four common herbs that have been used by many cultures and that are found in many of our kitchens.

 

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Creative Arts Help Veterans Reclaim Their Voice

For Angela Walker, music was her first love, her passion and her whole identity. “Once a singer, always a singer,” she often says. That was true even after she joined the U.S. Navy in 1985. But what happened next forever changed Walker’s perspective on what it means to have a voice.

When she was 26, Walker knew she had a calling to serve and protect her country and its ideals. She served as a naval airman and sang cadence in boot camp while training to work on helicopters. During boot camp, she developed a throat condition and lost her voice. When Walker was medically discharged, she was devastated. On top of that, Walker’s illness worsened, and she was later admitted to a U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) hospital, where she would meet a therapist who helped change her life.

“One day I met Jessie,” Walker recalled. “She played the piano and would encourage patients to sing along with her. She kept at me, until I gave in and sang ‘Summertime’ by Ella Fitzgerald. In that moment, I found my voice again.”

Once Walker began singing again, it was clear she still had talent. So much so that years later, she would become a five-time finalist at the National Veterans Creative Arts Festival (NVCAF), which is open to veterans who participate in their local VA hospital’s creative arts therapy programs. Veterans can submit their work in the categories of

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Visions of Sugar Plums

 
christmas-tree-sugar-plum-fairy

“'Sometimes mistakes make the most magical things happen'.  With hints of "The Nutcracker" and the "Night Before Chrsistmas", "Visions of Sugarplums is an exciting new work that tells a magical holiday story through traditional theater, music, and dance."  Children, bring your grandparents! Grandparents, bring the grandkids! A treat for all ages! 

November 25 - 2:00 & 7:00 PM; November 26 - 2:00 PM, Miller Center for the Arts, 4 N 2nd St, Reading, PA 19601

For tickets or information, see http://institute-of-arts.org/index.php/visions-of-sugarplums/ or call 610-376-1576

About Sacred Heart Villa

The Sisters of the Sacred Heart of Jesus Christ created Sacred Heart Villa (formerly St. Michael Convent) in 2003 with the vision of providing a personal care home for the Sisters and other seniors of southeastern Pennsylvania. The Sisters renovated St. Michael in order

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